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Monday, March 19, 2018

Visual Note Taking with Poetry

Over spring break, I managed to read another chapter of Keep it R.E.A.L!: Relevant, engaging, and affirming literacy for adolescent English learners by Dr. Mary Amanda Stewart. Chapter 3, "Read in a literature-rich classroom," offers strategies that are applicable to the middle school classroom, and today I was able to teach poetry in my STAAR class, a supplemental reading class consisting of various types of language learners, including ESL students. And let me tell you, I hate teaching poetry as much as the kids hate learning how to read it. But today, we all enjoyed it. 

Stewart writes, "Consider using poetry to develop students' listening skills...read the poem aloud without allowing students to see the words...Then, read the same poem while displaying the words for students and ask them if they now understood more" (54). I decided to combine this with a lesson on visual note taking (many of these students are also in my regular English classes, and I did not want to burden them with two class periods of standard note taking on our first day back from spring break). 

Introduction to visual notetaking

I began by showing my students a video from Youtube that addressed three components of visual note taking: decorative words, images, and connecting elements. Youtube is filled with videos about Sketchnotes and visual note taking. I chose the following video, as it is short enough to provide a general overview without overwhelming my students. 



Multiple "readings" of the poem

Because visual note taking was a new skill, I started with an easy poem, Jack Prelutsky's "Be glad your nose is on your face." One of my students recently informed me that I have a witch's nose, so I figured it was a good one to use in class. 

I wanted to engage in the note taking process with my students, so rather than reading the poem aloud to them, I found an audio recording on Youtube that did not display the text of the poem, forcing my students - and me - to use their listening skills. 



We listened to the poem multiple times, breaking our visual note taking into different rounds. While the students worked on their notes, I displayed my own paper via the document camera, modeling each step. For our first listen, we focused on words that caught our attention, adding them to our visual notes. We then listened again, drawing images that stood out to us. On the third, fourth, and fifth listens, we drew connectors between what we had drawn. 


Displaying the poem

The final layer of the visual note taking was the most complicated for my seventh graders, so I displayed the poem for them after we could no longer gather the information we needed by listening. The students and I referenced the text, adding more to our words, images, and connectors, adding more to their understanding of the poem. 


Be Glad Your Nose Is on Your Face

Be glad your nose is on your face,
not pasted on some other place,
you might dislike your nose a lot.
for if it were where it is not, Imagine if your precious nose
that clearly would not be a treat,
were sandwiched in between your toes, for you’d be forced to smell your feet.
it soon would drive you to despair,
Your nose would be a source of dread were it attached atop your head, forever tickled by your hair.
your brain would rattle from the breeze.
Within your ear, your nose would be an absolute catastrophe, for when you were obliged to sneeze,
be glad your nose is on your face!
Your nose, instead, through thick and thin, remains between your eyes and chin,
not pasted on some other place--
The results
For a first try, I was really impressed with my students. Not only did they enjoy the note taking strategy, they were actually invested in the poem, something that usually turns them off completely. I worked hard to remove the pressure of getting everything exactly right, focusing on building my students' ability to listen well. For ELLs with beginning and intermediate English skills, I think pairing them up with students with higher level skills might help connect the words and images together to convey meaning.
Tomorrow I am going to give them a more difficult, grade-level poem to work with to determine if they can garner meaning through visual note taking with a bit less support from me. Again, we will begin by listening to the poem without seeing the words. I am hoping that in the long run, the kids will start to hear how poetry should sound within their own minds without relying on the voice of another.
This one is mine. I think the kids did better. 

1 comment:

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